UCLA Study: Memory Loss Can Be Reversed

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For years it was assumed at memory loss from Alzheimer’s disease was irreversible. This study, though a small size, only 10 people, but is very encouraging. Memory loss can be reversed. It involves a personalized, multi-faceted approach but it worked. The one note to remember is that the earlier the intervention the better.

Six patients had discontinued working or had been struggling at their jobs at the time they joined the study; all were able to return to their jobs or continue working with improved performance, and their improvements have been sustained. (The patient in treatment the longest has been receiving the therapy for two-and-a-half years.)

Among the 10 were patients with memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment or subjective cognitive impairment (in which the patient reports cognitive problems). One patient who had been diagnosed with late stage Alzheimer’s did not improve.

The study was conducted Dr. Dale Bredesen of the UCLA Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. It is the first to suggest that memory loss in patients may be reversed — and improvement sustained — using a complex, 36-point therapeutic program that involves comprehensive diet changes, brain stimulation, exercise, sleep optimization, specific pharmaceuticals and vitamins, and multiple additional steps that affect brain chemistry.

Read the full study news release from UCLA.

1 Comment on UCLA Study: Memory Loss Can Be Reversed

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